Posts Tagged ‘harmful algal bloom’

Bowling Green adds $5.2M Lake Erie Center, and Cleveland Water Alliance signs a deal with Netherlands

Two big developments in fighting harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie: Bowling Green State University received $5.2 million in grants to create a Lake Erie Center for Fresh Waters and Human Health. The Cleveland Water Alliance signed a deal with the Netherlands to collaborate on research in nutrient management, Smart Lake technology and more.  Read…

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Lake Erie’s 2018 harmful algal bloom less severe than expected

Despite a forecast for a harmful algal bloom more severe than in 2016, the annual plague of Lake Erie remained relatively small this year. The bloom wasn’t smaller because of decreased phosphorus and nitrogen in the lake. So as the bloom season ends, scientists are studying the lake dynamics — from wind direction to wave…

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What’s the deal with Cleveland’s harmful algal blooms?

The harmful algae that bloomed at Cleveland’s Lake Erie beaches this week is different than the blooms that plague the Erie Islands, Port Clinton and the rest of the Western Basin each summer. Scientists are still researching what causes harmful algae in Lake Erie’s central basin, said Justin Chaffin, a senior researcher at Ohio State…

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Ohio awarded $215,000 in U.S. EPA beach grants

The U.S. EPA is awarding Ohio $215,000 in grants to protect the public at Lake Erie beaches this year, the EPA announced Wednesday. The grant will be used to help inform beachgoers about water quality so they can better enjoy Ohio’s beautiful beaches this summer without any worry, said EPA Region 5 Administrator Cathy Stepp.…

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Water-monitoring buoys launched in Lake Erie for the season

The Cleveland Water Department has launched two buoys for the season. The buoys’ sensors monitor Lake Erie 24/7, keeping track of water temperature, pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and other parameters to help address any changes in lake water quality before it is drawn into Cleveland’s four water treatment plants. The buoys work with the Great…

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What the heck is Lake Erie’s dead zone?

It sounds like a horror movie: the dead zone. But it happens every year in the central basin of Lake Erie, when warmer water stratifies from the colder water below and the oxygen gets used up by decaying organisms. Fish flee because the water has too little oxygen for them to survive. Organisms that can’t…

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