We get it. The Cuyahoga River is pure joy on a sunny summer day, a smooth spot for cruising, whether you’re on a jet ski, kayak or stand-up paddleboard. But the river is still a federal shipping channel. And those giant freighters have very little room to maneuver. So play it safe. Here’s what not…

Read More

Interlake Steamship Co. hasn’t built a new freighter since 1981. But its working on a 639-foot diesel ship, to be complete in 2022. Look for it on the Cuyahoga River then. See the full story at cleveland.com/rock-the-lake.

Read More

The crew lives on the ship, working six hours on and six hours off, seven days a week, for 60 days. So what’s it like aboard a laker? RocktheLake climbed aboard (literally, with a ladder) at the Port of Cleveland Bulk Terminal at Whiskey Island on Lake Erie to find out. We rode Interlake Steamship…

Read More

Paddling on the Cuyahoga River this summer? Members of the Cuyahoga River Safety Task Force are working on getting temporary digital signs to warn of coming freighters. Read all about it on cleveland.com/rock-the-lake.

Read More

To keep kayakers and stand-up paddlers safe on the Cuyahoga River, volunteers are forming a Cuyahoga River Ambassador Program — or CRAP, for short. The nonprofit Phastar Corp. is working with the Cleveland Metroparks, Foundry and Nalu Paddle & Surf to train about two dozen volunteers for the program. For more information, see cleveland.com/rock-the-lake.

Read More

The marine industry is expecting a shortage of workers, as Baby Boomers retire.  Ever dream about working on a ship? There are lots of opportunities.  Read all about them on cleveland.com/rock-the-lake.

Read More

The J.W. Westcott invented “mail-in-the-pail” in 1874. And 144 years later, it’s still using the technique to deliver letters, as well as packages and sometimes pizza, to freighters in the Detroit River.  It’s the only boat with its own U.S. ZIP Code. Read all about it on cleveland.com/rock-the-lake. 

Read More

We love to watch freighters. As long as the Terminal Tower is tall, the ships are eye-catching, mesmerizing, romantic vestiges of industrial glory days. We can’t get over their size, whether they’re powering through Lake Erie or pivoting around the hair-pin curves of the Cuyahoga River. They’re more than a pretty sight on the horizon.…

Read More

The 600-foot William G. Mather was once the biggest, grandest steamship in the Cleveland-Cliffs fleet, carrying 14,000 tons of iron ore from the shores of Lake Superior to the steel mills of Lake Erie. Now, the so-called “ship that built Cleveland” is docked in Cleveland’s North Coast Harbor, part of the Great Lakes Science Center…

Read More